This blog is all about helping professionals and experts write and publish a book based on their knowledge. I believe that the best non-fiction books are written to help their readers in some way. Memoirs and biographies inspire. How to books solve problems. Big idea books are thought-provoking and change your approach to business or life. Today I’m posing the question: “What non-fiction book has inspired you, shown you how to solve a problem, or introduced a new idea? Share how it impacted your life or business. ” I’ll give you my recommendation in the comments below.


Linda Griffin
Linda Griffin

Linda Griffin is the author of the book, Maximum Occupancy: How Smart Innkeepers put heads in beds in every season and the founder of ExpertAuthor411.com She is currently working on her second book, Book Smarts: The ninety day guide to writing and self-publishing for busy professionals.

    15 replies to "Share your non-fiction book recommendation"

    • Lynda Davis

      I’m always fascinated by what makes certain people rise above poverty, social disadvantages or other challenges to become successful. With that in mind, I really enjoyed The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. I also really enjoyed Catherine Gildiner’s trilogy, Too Close to The Falls, After The Falls, and Coming Ashore.

      • Linda Griffin

        Hi Lynda, I wasn’t familiar with your recommendations so I looked them up on Amazon. From their descriptions, they all seem like very powerful and life-changing books. Thanks for your comment.

    • Cheree Warrick

      Currently, I’m re-reading The Compound Effect by Darren Hardy. It’s more than a business book, it’s a life book. The little things we do today have a massive ripple effect over the next 5-50 years.

      • Linda Griffin

        Thanks for the recommendation Cheree. I like books that can be applied to business and life.

    • Joanna Lieberman

      A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park is excellent. Here is the write up from Amazon:
      The New York Times bestseller A Long Walk to Water begins as two stories, told in alternating sections, about two eleven-year-olds in Sudan, a girl in 2008 and a boy in 1985. The girl, Nya, is fetching water from a pond that is two hours’ walk from her home: she makes two trips to the pond every day. The boy, Salva, becomes one of the “lost boys” of Sudan, refugees who cover the African continent on foot as they search for their families and for a safe place to stay. Enduring every hardship from loneliness to attack by armed rebels to contact with killer lions and crocodiles, Salva is a survivor, and his story goes on to intersect with Nya’s in an astonishing and moving way.

      • Linda Griffin

        I’ve heard about that book. It sounds interesting but quite deep. Will add to my reading list.

    • Roger Carr

      I could list several business books that have had an impact on me. However, a recent book that changed me is not a business book. It is called Sleep Smarter by Shawn Stevenson. I learned more about sleep and how to get better sleep from this book and the recommended changes I have implemented work for me.

      • Linda Griffin

        Roger, I can sleep at the drop of a hat but maybe that’s because I’m not getting quality sleep. Will definitely check out your recommendation.

    • Lauren

      I absolutely love Cooked by Michael Pollan. It is a book about the modern food industry and our loss of decision making power to corporations. It is ridiculously informative and inspiring to anyone interest in health, agriculture or policy.

      • Linda Griffin

        Thanks Lauren. Cooked sounds quite interesting!

      • Joanna Lieberman

        Food Rules in another good one by Michael Pollan.

        • Linda Griffin

          Thanks Joanna. I’ll look Michael up on Amazon.

    • Linda Griffin

      My book recommendation is Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant by W. Chan Kim and Renée A. Mauborgne. My big take away was not to go head-to-head with competitors on their terms. A better strategy is to look for under served populations within the market and create products and services to support them. After reading the book, I created a set of services specifically for B&B owners.

      • Amar Vyas

        The book I would recommend is Arthashastra by Kautilya. The author Kautilya was a minister in the court of one of the ancient kings of India. Over 2,000 years ago, he wrote the basics of what we know today as economic theory and strategy. Interestingly enough, most of what he wrote is applicable today, with some exceptions that may not work in today’s society. The Art of War is a well known work. I would rate the Arthashashtra at par with it.

        • Linda Griffin

          Thanks for your comment Amar. I’ve read The Art of War but hadn’t heard about Arthashastra.

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